Podcasts

Subscribe on iTunes

Humanitarians Under Attack: Delivering Aid in Insecure Settings

Thursday, November 20, 2014

If the audio player above does not load, you can listen to the podcast here.

Recent high-profile attacks on humanitarian professionals in Syria and Iraq call attention to a disturbing trend: humanitarian agencies face growing threats and attacks on their staff. These attacks endanger their lives, violate international humanitarian law, and jeopardize the effective delivery of emergency relief to populations in need.

Violence against humanitarian aid workers reached record highs in 2013, with 155 aid workers killed globally. So far this year, at least 82 more have been killed. While such violence occurs in a variety of humanitarian settings, humanitarians are most vulnerable in situations of extremely more...



The “New World” of IHL Compliance: An Interview with Charles Garraway

Wednesday, November 12, 2014

If the audio player above does not load, you can listen to the podcast here.

In this episode, ATHA's Rob Grace talks with Professor Charles Garraway, who is a Vice-President of the International Humanitarian Fact-Finding Commission; faculty at the International Institute of International Law in San Remo, Italy; and a fellow at the Human Rights Centre at the University of Essex. Professor Garraway also has thirty years of experience in the United Kingdom Army Legal Services, where he served in various capacities, including as a criminal prosecutor and as an advisor in international humanitarian law. Rob asked Professor Garraway about the experiences and challenges faced by the International Humanitarian Fact-Finding Commission, and about broader issues of IHL compliance. 



Conflict Migration: Assessing the Approaches to Rehabilitation

Thursday, October 23, 2014

If the audio player above does not load, you can listen to the podcast here.

On World Refugee Day this year, the UN High Commissioner for Refugees reported that the number of refugees, asylum-seekers, and internally displaced people worldwide has exceeded 50 million people. Humanitarian organizations are currently struggling to address the needs of these displaced populations, due primarily to protracted armed conflict and other situations of violence. Existing legal, policy, and operational approaches to humanitarian protection are increasingly insufficient to keep up with patterns of conflict-related migration in North Africa and the Middle East, for example. Some argue that humanitarian interventions are slow more...



(C) IRIN News

Urban Humanitarian Response and Protection

Thursday, September 25, 2014

If the audio player above does not load, you can listen to the podcast here.

It is estimated that half of the world’s population currently resides in urban areas, and this number is expected to rise to 5 billion by 2030, with the largest cities emerging in Africa and Asia. Rapid urbanization has led to increased density, overcrowding, and strain on local infrastructure and public services. This, in turn, has reduced the security of urban dwellers, and magnified their vulnerabilities to natural disaster and violent conflict. Along with growing mass urbanization has come an unprecedented level of violence and crime in densely populated slums and shantytowns. Cities like Kingston, Rio de Janeiro, and more...



Grappling with the Challenges of Rapid Urbanization: An Interview with Dr. Ronak Patel

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

If the audio player above does not load, you can listen to the podcast here.

ATHA’s Anaide Nahikian recently sat down with Dr. Ronak Patel, founder and director of the Urbanization and Crises Program at the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative. Dr. Patel is also Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and a practicing attending physician in emergency medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital.

This discussion centers on Dr. Patel’s research into the challenges for humanitarian intervention presented by rapid urbanization, and the...



Humanitarian Assistance Webcast - Thinking Local: Trends and Standards in Capacity-Building

Thursday, July 24, 2014

The dynamics of contemporary conflicts have made the way in which international actors understand and support local agencies increasingly important. As we have seen, states have become much more assertive in the way in which they relate to humanitarian actors and the building of local capacity is not simply good humanitarian practice but, ultimately, necessary to reach affected populations.   However, humanitarian action has grown into an international industry and must contend with the variety of political and bureaucratic considerations that accompany such growth. As a result, capacity building, particularly for regional offices and local partners, has become one of the most complex and controversial discussions among and within humanitarian agencies.     This Humanitarian Assistance Webcast will facilitate a re-examination of the current humanitarian response structure and discuss what opportunities exist to redefine the relationship between international and more...


Humanitarian Assistance Webcast: The Contemporary Role of Faith-based Aid

Thursday, June 19, 2014

Faith-based humanitarian organizations have played a central role in responding to humanitarian needs for centuries. While deeply rooted in principles of faith and charity, these organizations also represent a community of influential donors. As such, they are uniquely positioned to lead programs in assistance, protection, and advocacy in complex humanitarian environments. Furthermore, given their continued investment and presence in local communities, faith-based organizations are often the first to respond to humanitarian disasters or conflict.This webcast will discuss the role of faith-based humanitarian organizations and the operational challenges faced by both faith-based and secular humanitarian organizations in their work.

 

Through discussions with experts and practitioners, the webcast will explore the following questions:

What is the relationship between the core principles and standards for humanitarian more...


Save Lives or Save the Regimes? An Interview with Dr. François Audet

Wednesday, June 11, 2014

If the audio player above does not load, you can listen to the podcast here.

ATHA’s Anaide Nahikian recently sat down with Dr. François Audet, Scientific Director of the Canadian Research Institute on Humanitarian Crisis and Aid (OCCAH) and a professor of management and technology at the Université du Québec à Montréal. Their discussion centered on Dr. Audet’s recent research, which looks at the interest and attitudes of western humanitarian organizations in developing local capacities, and explores the influences behind agencies’ decision-making...



Humanitarian Assistance Webcast: Syrian Refugee Response: Evolving Protection Challenges

Thursday, May 15, 2014

The Syrian refugee crisis represents one of the greatest humanitarian challenges the international community has faced over recent years, prompting record-high levels of international assistance and programming. The ongoing conflict has generated the displacement of over two million refugees since the beginning of the conflict, resulting in one of the largest, regional refugee crises in recent history. It is projected by UNHCR that by end of 2014, the total refugee population in the region, particularly in Jordan, Lebanon, Turkey, and Iraq, could reach up to four million people.

In view of the complex political and social environment in which humanitarian challenges arise and the historical scale of the population affected, programmatic responses to humanitarian protection are essential to address the evolving needs of refugees and reducing instability in the Middle East region. The Syrian refugee crisis has prompted a number of debates that have had a significant impact on more...



Humanitarian Assistance Webcast: New Warfare Technologies, New Protection Challenges

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Recent scientific and technological advances have given rise to unprecedented means and methods of warfare. Some of these new technologies — such as observation and combat drones — are already in use, while others — for example, nanotechnologies, combat robots, and laser weapons — are still in experimental stages.

These developments have, and will continue to, profoundly change the ways that modern actors engage in armed conflict. On the one hand, these technologies can not only limit civilian losses but also can spare the lives of combatants. On the other hand, certain features of these new technologies raise unprecedented issues that make the legality of an attack more difficult to ascertain and the attribution of responsibility more complex.

This Humanitarian Action Webcast, produced in partnership with the International Review of the Red Cross, will explore contemporary technological developments and will discuss the resulting challenges that emerge for more...



Pages

Recent Tweets

Our Sponsor


A Program Of




All materials © 2014 Harvard University


Back to Top

Back to Top